Blind sound tasting: can you distinguish the "like you" from Shakira and Briella, who accuses him of plagiarism?

Blind sound tasting: can you distinguish the “like you” from Shakira and Briella, who accuses him of plagiarism?

Share it

Shakira’s new vendetta against Gerard Piqué in the form of a song arrived this Thursday at the electronic terminals of the entire planet, but it was followed, after a few hours, by an unforeseen controversy. The Venezuelan reggaeton Briella celebrated on her Twitter account that the catchiest melody of the new song by the Colombian artist, created together with BZRP (BZRP Music Session #53), was a carbon copy of the chorus of another song of his entitled Only you. But before explaining differences and similarities, we propose a blind “sound tasting”:

Could you distinguish which of these audios is from “como you uhuhuhu” from Shakira and which one from Briella?

Option 1

Option 2

Halftone: this is the only difference between the two songs when it comes to the chorus. When in both songs a chorus is made with the syllable “tú”, the only thing that changes is the D minor chord that Shakira starts with (option 1), which is half a tone below the E flat minor used by Briella (option 1). 2). But the interval between the four notes in the ascending line of this “uuuhh” and the one that finally descends on the staff is exactly the same.


The timing of the “uuuhh” vowel progression

Shakira lowers a half tone

regarding Briella

The timing of the “uuuhh” vowel progression

Shakira lowers a half tone

regarding Briella

The timing of the “uuuhh” vowel progression

Shakira lowers half a tone with respect to Briella

In addition, Shakira’s phrase in this “túúúúúúú” lasts two bars longer than in the case of Briella. That is, she adds another two measures by making a variation of the melody and a change of chord. Briella’s phrase is only two bars long, but they are actually identical to Shakira’s, as you can see in the staff above.

Below we propose a new sound tasting at a more advanced moment of both songs, when the effect is used sampler to speed up and mechanize this chorus.

Option 1

Option 2

In this second tasting, the first corresponds to Briella and the second to Shakira. Actually, Shakira uses this chorus as the central commercial hook of the song that, beware, moves away from her characteristic reggaeton rhythm that she herself introduced into the sphere mainstream more than two decades ago. That catchy line appears in Briella’s case only as a sentence ending.

Even in the case of just a couple of bars, the plagiarism alarms have gone off urbi et orbe. Because no matter how much the notion circulates that there is a regulation regarding a minimum of equal measures to bring a case of plagiarism to trial, the truth is that in Spain such precision does not exist. The Union of Musicians (UdM) warns that the Criminal Code establishes in its Article 270 penalties for whoever plagiarizes, but does not clearly define the requirements for a song to be considered plagiarism of another.

The Supreme Court ruling of January 28, 1995 did set a precedent, which considered plagiarism as “everything that involves copying the substantial works of others”. And with this precedent in hand, it wouldn’t be strange if this brief vocal line sung by both Latin American artists was considered substantial in the context of each song. That is if their rights had been registered in Spain, which is not the case.

Actually, the Spanish Law is applied considering the possibility that the plagiarized measures are part of the general cultural heritage of a certain musical style. That is, if the style has characteristic elements that a singer-songwriter can tend to spontaneously, the coincidence or similarity would not be taken into account.

When artists are “inspired”

So, is it coincidence? Is it an overuse of common resources of this urban pop? Is it an involuntary plagiarism of Shakira herself or of her colleague Bizarrap of hers who signs that creation with her? or is it a blatant copy?

The young singer-songwriter from Barcelona, ​​Julieta, explains to what extent musical creators are today exposed to all kinds of inputswhich forces them to make sure that their new compositions were not in their head because they had previously heard them somewhere.

“Today there is the possibility that without intending it, similar songs end up coming out,” he explains to The vanguard. Briella’s theme was very popular on TikTok, many people had heard it, so this unconscious memory could have been produced in Bizarrap’s brain or in Shakira’s own.

“But the progression of this vocal line does not seem so complex to me that this coincidence is impossible,” he points out. Sometimes the producers themselves propose a specific vocal line to the interpreter, and precisely Bizarrap would be one of them… “but at the same time, this vocal line has the Shakira brand, she could clearly have created it.”

It has happened to me that I have accidentally composed fragments of songs and suddenly doubt has assailed me”



JulietBarcelona composer and singer

And he adds: “It has happened to me that I have accidentally composed fragments of songs and suddenly doubts have assailed me… and I have sent them on audio to friends so they can confirm that they don’t sound like anything. It is normal, I am very sponge. And in the end in pop the chord progressions are finite. And there are chords that suggest a melody. It happens to many groups”.

In fact, these types of choirs find today a clear inspiration in the well-known theme Moves like Jagger by the Maroon 5. The band uses eighth notes, it’s true, while, as seen in the staff above, Shakira and Briella sing quarter note values, that is, each note lasts twice as long within the bar.

Going down a half step but keeping the chord and melody relationship is a little trick that arouses suspicion”



Joan PerezBarcelona composer and bassist

It is explained by Barcelona bassist and composer Joan Pérez, versed in pop and rock. According to him, a feature that raises suspicions of plagiarism is that lowering of half a tone in Shakira’s theme, while keeping the relationship between the chord and the melody. “It’s a kind of little trap that plagiarists often use to escape copyright rules. But Shakira may not even be aware of it, because she’s a business brain and that wouldn’t have escaped her.” Other examples of plagiarism induced by totems such as the Beatles, or more specifically George Harrison with his famous song my sweet lord. In 1976, he was found guilty of “unknowingly copying” a Ronnie Mack song called He’s so Fine.

read also


#Blind #sound #tasting #distinguish #Shakira #Briella #accuses #plagiarism


Share it