bulos vitamina d

Health professionals and clinical guidelines are key to dismantling false myths about vitamin D – Pharma Market Magazine

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Misinformation among the general population about vitamin D has been the subject of debate “Be careful with the sources, many talk about vitamins but few know”, recently held in person and virtually. The talk, moderated by Margarida Moredelegate of the National Association of Health Informants (ANIS) in Catalonia, has shown what the current panorama is when it comes to talking about vitamin D and has reflected the essential role played by professionals in consultation when guiding its consumption.

Hoaxes about Vitamin D

The starting point for the information on vitamin D and its greater or lesser benefit have been largely generated with the arrival of COVID-19, when a significant number of hoaxes began to be created.

Erroneous or false information harms people’s health, so it is important to use reliable sources and avoid spreading unverified information: “It is necessary to combat health hoaxes and train patients, health professionals and citizens in access to truthful information on health on the internet, and on improving clinical communication. “We all have one responsibility when disclosing in health, media, organizations, health professionals and the general population. We cannot send alarmist messages or false promises because that has health consequences. The basis must always be on the evidence of the clinical guidelines”has emphasized Carlos Mateos, coordinator of the #SaludsinBulos Institute.

The starting point for the information on vitamin D and its greater or lesser benefit have been largely generated with the arrival of COVID-19, when a significant number of hoaxes began to be created.

hypovitaminosis and hypervitaminosis

The hypovitaminosis or vitamin D deficiency it has become a public health problem throughout the world and affects more than half of the population. In Spain, vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency has been described in all ages and in both sexes (children, young people, adults, postmenopausal women and the elderly).

Hypovitaminosis or vitamin D deficiency has become a public health problem throughout the world and affects more than half of the population.

Similarly, prevalence is high among many types of disease processes, such as in patients with obesity, diabetes, chronic kidney disease or atopic dermatitisamong others.

National scientific societies, such as the Spanish Society for Bone Research and Mineral Metabolism (Seiomm) and international such as the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF), the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), the Endocrine Society (ES) and the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF), have agreed that the optimal needs for cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) are those that allow maintaining serum levels around 30ng/mL.

Vitamin D supplementation is indicated for the treatment of hypovitaminosis, so the specialist doctor is the one who must prescribe an individualized treatment for the patient, paying special attention to their habits, state of health and requirements.

Vitamin D supplementation is indicated for the treatment of hypovitaminosis, so the specialist doctor is the one who must prescribe an individualized treatment for the patient, paying special attention to their habits, state of health and requirements. “In a treatment of hypovitaminosis D, they can be used initially 25,000 IU of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) a week during the first months to recover vitamin D levels, and continue with maintenance with 25,000 IU of cholecalciferol monthly or fortnightly. The IOF and the ES recommend in the population at risk and with osteoporosis to maintain an intake of 1,500-2,000 IU of cholecalciferol/day (equivalent to 25,000 IU of cholecalciferol fortnightly)”, points out the doctor Gonzalo Allo specialist of the endocrinology service of the Hospital 12 de Octubre in Madrid.

“The IOF and the ES recommend in the population at risk and with osteoporosis to maintain an intake of 1,500-2,000 IU of cholecalciferol/day (equivalent to 25,000 IU of cholecalciferol fortnightly)”.

Likewise, and despite the fact that it is an infrequent complication, an overdose of vitamin D can lead to a situation of hypercalcaemia. That is why the figure of the doctor and the specialist are positioned as indispensable when it comes to diagnose a vitamin D deficiency, indicate the appropriate treatment for the patient (dose and frequency) and monitor their vitamin D levels.

Profile of patients with vitamin D deficiency

There is a part of the population with deficiency in vitamin D levels in which it is necessary to focus for its early detection, in addition to patients with osteoporosis, such as the elderly population with immobilized or hospitalized, population that wears clothing that covers the whole body throughout the year, especially dark-skinned pregnant women, patients with intestinal malabsorption (celiac, inflammatory bowel disease, gastrectomy or bariatric surgery), patients with pathologies where sun exposure is contraindicated, patients with kidney failure, hyperparathyroidism or morbid obesity, patients with signs of osteomalacia or bone pain.

There is a part of the population with deficiency in vitamin D levels in which we must focus for early detection.

Vitamin D levels in various therapeutic areas

In addition to its importance in bone metabolism, vitamin D directly influences many areas of our body, and it has been shown that the deficiency of said vitamin is associated with: impaired immune system (against the prevention of infections, or in autoimmune diseases), increased prevalence of colon cancer, deterioration of skin problems, lower muscle performance and increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

The expert also addressed the relevant role that meets Vitamin D in sport and how adequate levels relate to improved muscle function and fewer injuries.

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